Graduate Catalog

School of Podiatric Medicine

Bryan D. Caldwell, DPM, MD, Dean

Shanika Hill, DPM, Associate Dean of Clinical Education

Sanjay Sesodia, PhD, Associate Academic Dean

Graham Shaw, PhD, Chair, Basic Medical Sciences

Doctor of Podiatric Medicine Program (DPM)

Faculty: Armstrong, Brill, Buchman, Caldwell, Cawley, Cuffy, Hill, Homer, Losito, Merrill, Rodriguez Anaya, Sesodia, Shaw, Singh, Smith, Snyder

In 1985, Barry University created the School of Podiatric Medicine (BUSPM) as its first venture into professional medical education. In 1997, the Physician Assistant program was established to extend Barry University’s role in the education of health care professionals, and the name of the school was changed to the School of Graduate Medical Sciences to provide the infrastructure necessary to coordinate the academic activities in Podiatric Medicine and Physician Assistant programs into a cohesive unit. The Professional Master of Public Health, a collaborative program of the Schools of Graduate Medical Sciences and Natural and Health Sciences, was established in the School of Graduate Medical Sciences in 2002. The School of Graduate Medical Sciences was renamed the School of Podiatric Medicine in 2008 at which time the Professional Master of Public Health program was moved to the College of Nursing and Health Sciences. In 2019, the Physician Assistant program was transferred to the College of Nursing and Health Sciences

In addition to the noted programs, other graduate medical science programs, leading to masters and doctoral-level degrees, are anticipated to further utilize the academic resources of the School and Barry University. Students in the School of Podiatric Medicine currently have the opportunity to also earn a Master’s degree in Business Administration in the D. Inez Andreas School of Business.

The Barry University School of Podiatric Medicine is currently accredited by the Council on Podiatric Medical Education.

Council on Podiatric Medical Education

9312 Old Georgetown Road

Bethesda, MD 20814‑1621

Phone: (301) 581‑9200

Podiatric Medicine Mission and Programmatic Outcomes

Our Mission

The mission of the Doctor of Podiatric Medicine program is to graduate skilled podiatric physicians qualified to enter residency training. This is accomplished by excellence in podiatric medical education, fostering life-long learning, expressing a commitment to social justice by serving the local and global community through quality patient care, and encouraging research and medical innovation that promotes the common good.

Our Vision

The vision of the Doctor of Podiatric Medicine program is to train the next generation of highly qualified podiatric physicians to be leaders in the profession.

CPME Competencies

The following eight core components of podiatric competence developed by the Council of Deans of the American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine and approved by both the Council of Deans and the Council on Podiatric Medical Education. The competencies reflect and are guided by the recommendations of the Educational Enhancement Project of the American Podiatric Medical Association.

  1. Apply current and emerging knowledge of human structure, function, development, pathology, pathophysiology, and psychosocial development to patient care. The knowledge obtained provides a foundation in clinical training, residency training, and practice in podiatric medicine.
  2. Provide effective and compassionate patient-centered care (with emphasis on the lower extremity) that promotes overall health to diverse populations. Exhibit cultural awareness to ensure that patients and their families are provided the highest quality of care that demonstrates respect for diverse cultures.
  3. Apply scientific methods and utilize clinical and translational research to further the understanding of contemporary podiatric medicine and its application to patient care.
  4. Demonstrate communication and interpersonal skills that result in relevant and professional information exchange and decision-making with patients, their families, and members of the healthcare team
  5. Exhibit the highest standards of competence, ethics, integrity, and accountability. Place the patient’s interest above oneself.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to work as an effective member of a health-care team.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of common societal problems (e.g., issues of addiction or abuse) and their impact on patients and their families.

Program Goals and Outcomes

Program Goal 1: Produce highly educated, competent, compassionate doctors of podiatric medicine.

  • Programmatic Outcome - BUSPM will graduate students that demonstrate the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes to compete for placement in a post-graduate podiatric residency program.

Program Goal 2: Recruit and retain a diverse and qualified student body.

  • Programmatic Outcome - Implement a more comprehensive admissions process that would contribute/enhance the diversity of the class.
  • Programmatic Outcome - Retain and graduate all matriculated students.

Program Goal 3: Increase visibility of BUSPM inside and outside the Barry community.

  • Programmatic Outcome - Develop a sound marketing plan designed to raise awareness of the profession, the program, and careers and accomplishments of faculty.
  • Programmatic Outcome - Develop a ‘pipeline to podiatric medicine’ program.
  • Programmatic Outcome – Increase faculty publications in scholarly journals

Program Goal 4: Maintain a collaborative, productive learning environment that positively impacts student experience.

  • Programmatic Outcome - Enhance basic science experience.
  • Programmatic Outcome - Enhance clinical rotation experience.
  • Programmatic Outcome – Encourage faculty to engage in professional development.
  • Programmatic Outcome – Encourage staff to engage in professional development.

Program Goal 5: Increase alumni engagement.

  • Programmatic Outcome - Strengthen existing alumni relations.

Basic Medical Sciences Objectives

Upon completion of the basic medical sciences curriculum, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the normal structure and function of the human body and its components;
  2. Evaluate the contribution of molecular, biochemical and cellular mechanisms to homeostasis;
  3. State units of measurement appropriate to a medical or scientific parameter;
  4. Analyze altered structure and function of the body in disease conditions;
  5. Interpret and analyze scientific data;
  6. Articulate, using specific examples, various disease etiologies and suggest appropriate current treatment modalities;
  7. Retrieve and present medical and scientific information in various forms;
  8. Utilize a wide variety of basic science resources to solve clinical problems;
  9. Be eligible for the National Board of Podiatric Medical Examiners’ Part I examination;
  10. Integrate basic medical science knowledge into clinical applications;
  11. Identify test values outside the normal range and suggest a diagnosis, given a patient chart;
  12. Demonstrate moral and ethical behavior in and out of the classroom.

Clinical Program Objectives

Upon completion of the clinical sciences curriculum, students will be able to:

  1. Perform a complete medical history and lower extremity physical exam;
  2. Differentiate between normal and abnormal findings;
  3. Analyze and interpret all blood and diagnostic laboratory studies;
  4. Recognize and differentiate signs and symptoms of systemic disease that manifest in the lower extremity;
  5. Perform a biomechanical examination and gait analysis, recognizing pathology;
  6. Assess and evaluate foot and ankle radiographs and other imaging studies and recognize pathology;
  7. Order appropriate diagnostic tests;
  8. Create a differential diagnosis;
  9. Organize a treatment plan;
  10. Provide appropriate perioperative podiatric care;
  11. Demonstrate proficiency in palliative foot care including strapping, padding, injections, paring of lesions, and casting;
  12. Demonstrate proficiency in basic podiatric surgical principles, including soft tissue and osseous procedures;
  13. Apply knowledge of pharmacology and therapeutics in prescription writing;
  14. Generate appropriate charting, whether electronic or paper;
  15. Practice effectively as part of the medical team providing total healthcare to the patient.

Podiatric Clerkship Objectives

The component of the clerkship combined with didactic background provides the student with the knowledge, skills, and values of podiatric medical practice. The student should develop the philosophy and general skills that would be required of a podiatric resident.

  1. Interactions (Patients, staff and peers)

a.  Demonstrate listening and interviewing skills;

b. Demonstrate compassionate patient care;

c.  Demonstrate appropriate communicative skills with patients, attendings, residents, and peers;

d. Demonstrate ability to accept and respond to criticism.

2. Professionalism and Ethics

a.  Demonstrate reliability and dependability;

b. Demonstrate skillful communication with patients and other clinicians;

c.  Demonstrate professional and compassionate rapport with patients and peers;

d. Comprehend the rationale for accepting criticism;

e.  Demonstrate motivation to learn and knowledge base;

f.  Follow instructions and protocols.

3. Clinical: Cognitive, Psychomotor

a.  Perform a complete medical history and lower extremity physical exam and be able to differentiate normal from abnormal findings;

b. Demonstrate proficiency in palliative foot care and basic podiatric surgical principles, including digital nail, soft tissue, and osseous procedures;

c.  Analyze and interpret all blood and diagnostic laboratory studies;

d. Assess and evaluate foot and ankle radiographs and recognize pathology;

e.  Perform a biomechanical examination and gait analysis, recognizing pathology;

f.  Differentiate signs and symptoms of systemic disease that manifest in the foot;

g. Analyze a patient case, order appropriate diagnostic tests, create a differential diagnosis, and organize a treatment plan;

h. Apply knowledge of pharmacology and therapeutics in prescription writing;

i.  Generate appropriate charting including History and Physical, Prescription notes, and orders;

j.  Demonstrate appropriate patient and colleague rapport, empathy, and professionalism.

Podiatric Clinical Rotations

Participation in the clinical rotations is contingent upon successful completion of all the course work in the first and second years.

Treating patients in clinical settings is a privilege. All students must have successfully completed the Clinical Orientation and Skills Workshop (SPM 712) prior to beginning clinical rotations. Clinical rotations generally consist of two- or four-week educational experiences in hospital-based medical and surgical, foot and ankle care. Students will actively participate in various rotations such as podiatric medicine and surgery clinic, general surgery, internal medicine, vascular medicine, emergency medicine, anesthesia. Faculty, educational objectives, and specific rules and regulations are delineated in the Clinical Rotation Training Manual, which serves as the syllabus for all clinical rotations. Each student’s clinical rotation schedule will be posted prior to the beginning of each semester. Students may not change, alter, or rearrange their clinical schedule without prior approval of the Associate Dean of Clinical Education. Attendance at each rotation site is mandatory. All absences will require additional clinical education experiences. Unexcused absences will result in an unfavorable assessment as stipulated in the Clinical Rotation Training Manual and a Professional Deficiency citation.

The dress code is absolute; cleaned and pressed white jackets for all students; tailored slacks, shirt, and tie for men; tailored slacks or skirts (knee length) and collared blouse for women. Appropriate footwear is required.

Any student who is removed from a clinical or hospital rotation due to improper dress will receive a professional deficiency citation. Any student who is removed from a clinical or hospital rotation due to behavior, or other violation of the Clinical Rotation Training Manual may be placed on probation. If the violation recurs, action may be taken by the Associate Dean of Clinical Education resulting in an additional Professional Deficiency citation that may lead to suspension from BUSPM. Professional attitude, motivation, maturity, poise, and capacity to accept and respond to criticism of faculty and peers are evaluated. Additionally, manual dexterity, diagnostic acumen, completeness and accuracy of charting, and documentation are graded.

At the completion of their rotations, students will:

  1. elicit an appropriate podiatric history;
  2. perform an appropriate podiatric physical examination;
  3. identify, comprehend, and apply therapeutic regimes for those disorders/diseases that are intrinsic to the foot;
  4. comprehend and apply perioperative podiatric care;
  5. comprehend and apply basic surgical techniques;
  6. comprehend the complications in foot surgery and apply therapeutic principles in their prevention and management;
  7. comprehend the problems of aging and applying the appropriate therapeutic regime;
  8. comprehend the levels of podiatric medical problems (primary, secondary, and tertiary) and offer the appropriate therapeutic regime; and
  9. recognize the team concept of care and comprehend the podiatric physician’s role in the total health care of the patient.

At the end of the rotation each extern will be evaluated by mechanisms established by the School of Podiatric Medicine. In the spring semester of their third year, all students must pass the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Students who fail this examination will be required to take remedial instruction until competency has been demonstrated. Students will not be permitted to enter fourth-year clerkships until they have passed all clinical rotations and the OSCE.

Clinical Remediation Policy

All students who fail a rotation will be required to successfully remediate it in its entirety. This remediation shall occur at a date set by the Associate Dean of Clinical Education. The maximum grade that may be attained after successful completion of the remediation will be a grade of C or CR depending on the course. The remedial grade shall replace the previously earned failed grade for the rotation. Students who fail to successfully complete a failed rotation shall not advance to the fourth year. This remediation option is only permitted for one course or rotation per semester and cannot be utilized more than three times in the Program. Students cannot remediate any course or rotation more than once. Successful completion of all clinical rotations, OSCE, clerkships and Senior Exit Exam are required for graduation.

The Professional and Technical Standards for Admission, Enrollment, and Graduation

Medical education requires that the accumulation of scientific knowledge be accompanied by the simultaneous acquisition of skills and professional attitudes and behavior. The faculty has a responsibility to society to matriculate, educate and graduate the best possible podiatric physicians, and thus admission to medical school is offered only to those with the greatest potential for success in medical school and in the practice of podiatric medicine. Technical standards presented below are requisite for admission, continued enrollment, and graduation from Barry University’s School of Podiatric Medicine. Students may be dismissed from the School of Podiatric Medicine for noncompliance with any of the technical standards delineated below. Unless otherwise noted, successful completion and passage of examinations in all courses in the curriculum is required in order to develop essential skills necessary to become a competent podiatric physician.

Graduates of the School of Podiatric Medicine must have the knowledge and skills to function in a variety of clinical situations and to render a wide spectrum of patient care. The School of Podiatric Medicine acknowledges Section 504 of the 1973 Vocational Rehabilitation Act and PL 101‑336, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), but ascertains that compliance with certain technical standards must be demonstrated in all prospective candidates.

A candidate for the DPM degree must have aptitude, abilities, and skills in five areas: observation; communication; motor; conceptual, integrative and quantitative; and behavioral and social. Although technological compensation is acceptable for some deficiencies, candidates must be able to perform in the five above areas in a reasonably independent manner. The use of a trained intermediary to perform certain tasks would mean that a candidate’s judgment must be integrated with another’s power of selection and observation. Therefore, third parties cannot assist students in accomplishing curricular requirements in the five skill areas specified above.

Observation

The candidate for the DPM degree must be able to observe demonstrations and participate in experiments in the basic sciences, including, but not limited to, physiological and pharmacological demonstrations, microbiological cultures, and microscopic studies of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathological states. The candidate must be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand. Observation necessitates the functional use of the sense of vision and other sensory modalities, especially the functional use of the senses of smell and touch.

Communication

The candidate for the DPM degree should be able to speak, to hear, and to observe patients in order to elicit information; to describe changes in mood, activity, and posture; and to perceive nonverbal communications. The candidate must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. Communication includes not only speech, but also reading and writing. The candidate must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written form with all members of the health care team. All courses in the School of Podiatric Medicine are conducted in English; communication skills in the English language are therefore requisite.

Motor Coordination or Function

The candidate for the DPM degree should have sufficient motor function to elicit information from patients by palpation, auscultation, percussion, and other diagnostic maneuvers. The candidate should be able to order basic laboratory tests (urinalysis, CBC, etc.), carry out diagnostic procedures (phlebotomy, arthrocentesis, etc.), and read EKGs and radiographs. The candidate should be able to execute motor movements reasonably required to provide general care and emergency treatment to patients. Examples of emergency treatment reasonably required of podiatric physicians are cardiopulmonary resuscitation, administration of intravenous medication, application of pressure to stop bleeding, opening of obstructed airways, suturing of simple wounds, and performance of simple operative maneuvers. Such actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium and coordinated use of the senses of touch and vision.

Intellectual-Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities

Intellectual-conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis, and synthesis. Problem-solving, the critical skill demanded of physicians, requires all these intellectual abilities. In addition, the candidate for the DPM degree should be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand the spatial relationships of structures.

Behavioral and Social Attributes

The candidate for the DPM degree must possess emotional health required for full use of their intellectual abilities, exercise of good judgment, prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and development of mature, sensitive and effective therapeutic relationships with patients. The candidate must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and to function effectively when stressed. The candidate must be able to adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility and to learn to function in the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of many patients. Empathy, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal skills, interest and motivation are all personal qualities that are assessed at all stages during the admission and educational processes.

The candidate for the DPM degree must have somatic sensation and the functional use of the senses of vision and hearing as well as equilibrium, smell and taste. Additionally, the candidate must have sufficient exteroceptive sense (touch, pain, and temperature), sufficient proprioceptive sense (position, pressure, movement, stereognosis, and vibratory) and sufficient motor function to permit them to carry out the activities described in the section above. The candidate must be able to consistently, quickly, and accurately integrate all information received by all sense(s) employed and must have the intellectual ability to learn, integrate, analyze, and synthesize data.

The Barry University School of Podiatric Medicine will consider for admission an applicant who demonstrates the ability to perform or demonstrates the aptitude to learn to perform the skills listed above. Students are evaluated not only on their scholastic accomplishments, but also on their physical and emotional stability and capacities to meet all requirements of the program’s curriculum. Candidates for the DPM degree graduate as skilled and effective practitioners of podiatric medicine.

The following technical queries are relevant to the admissions and student evaluation processes:

  1. Is the candidate able to observe demonstrations and participate in experiments in the basic sciences?
  2. Is the candidate able to analyze, synthesize, extrapolate, solve problems, and reach medically sound diagnostic and therapeutic judgments?
  3. Does the candidate have sufficient use of the senses of vision and hearing and the somatic sensation necessary to perform a physical examination? Can the candidate be trained to perform palpation, auscultation, and percussion?
  4. Can the candidate reasonably be expected to relate to patients and establish sensitive, professional relationships with patients?
  5. Can the candidate reasonably be expected to communicate the results of an examination to the patient and to the candidate’s colleagues with accuracy, clarity and efficiency?
  6. Can the candidate reasonably be expected to learn and perform routine laboratory tests and diagnostic procedures?
  7. Can the candidate reasonably be expected to perform with precise, quick, and appropriate actions in emergency situations?
  8. Can the candidate reasonably be expected to display good judgment in the assessment and treatment of patients?
  9. Can the candidate reasonably be expected to possess the perseverance, diligence, and consistency to complete the medical program curriculum and enter podiatric residency and the independent practice of podiatric medicine and surgery?
  10. Can the candidate reasonably be expected to accept criticism and respond by appropriate modification of behavior?

Admission Requirements

A minimum of 90 credits of undergraduate study at a regionally accredited or internationally recognized undergraduate institution is required for admission to the School of Podiatric Medicine. The most satisfactory preparation for admission is the successful completion of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or school of arts and sciences in the United States.

Each student’s academic credentials must include:

•   Biology (8 credits)

•   General or Inorganic Chemistry (8 credits)

•   Organic Chemistry (8 credits)

•   Physics (8 credits)

•   English (6 credits)

It is further recommended that all candidates complete courses in cell and molecular biology, genetics, anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry to strengthen their premedical background. Successful completion of an upper-level course in Human Physiology is particularly encouraged.

In addition to the standard AACPMAS application forms (see as follows), each candidate must also submit 1 letter of recommendation from a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, as well as current scores of the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). The date of the most recent MCAT must be within three (3) years of the time of application. Under certain circumstances, a USMLE score may be submitted in place of the MCAT.

Applicants who do not give evidence of being native English speakers, including those applying for transfer from U.S. institutions, or who have not graduated from an institution where English is the primary language of instruction must submit a TOEFL or IELTS score. The minimum required scores are:

IELTS: 7.5

TOEFL iBT: 100

TOEFL paper-based test: 600

The TOEFL or IELTS may be waived for applicants with a minimum of 24 college-level academic credits earned from an institution in which English is the basis of instruction and classroom interaction.

A personal interview is required and arranged only by invitation of the Admissions Committee. Prior to the interview, applicants should visit the office of at least one practicing Doctor of Podiatric Medicine to discuss and observe the practice of modern podiatric care. A letter confirming that visit is required by the Admissions Committee and should be included in the candidate folder before the time of interview. The Admissions Committee strongly recommends that the candidate folder be as complete as possible, including American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine Application Service (AACPMAS) application forms, podiatrist visitation confirmation, and MCAT scores, to facilitate the interview and avoid unnecessary delays in the admission process.

In addition to the education requirements, all candidates and students must display the mental, psychological, and moral character that will enable them to successfully complete the educational program and will prepare them for the professional responsibilities and privileges of a licensed Doctor of Podiatric Medicine. Applicants should refer to the earlier topic, “The Professional and Technical Standards for Admission, Enrollment, and Graduation” for a comprehensive description of program requirements.

Diversity Policy

The School of Podiatric Medicine seeks to identify and recruit those students most likely to succeed in podiatric medical education regardless of age, race and ethnicity, religion, gender, or sexual orientation. BUSPM also welcomes applications from veterans of military service.

Application Procedure

Barry University School of Podiatric Medicine and other institutions offering programs in podiatric medicine are participants in the AACPMAS. This service allows a student to complete a single set of AACPMAS forms for any of the colleges of podiatric medicine. The service collects and collates data, computes grade point averages, and transmits copies of the application to the college/school selected on the application. Applications are secured by contacting:

American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine

P.O. Box 9200

Watertown, MA 02471

Phone: (617) 612‑2900

To download an application or apply online, visit http://www.aacpm.org/

To request an informational brochure, send an e-mail to aacpmas@aacpm.org

All inquiries or communications concerning admissions should be addressed to:

Office of Podiatric Admissions

Barry University

11300 N.E. Second Avenue

Miami Shores, Florida 33161

Phone: (305) 899‑3123

Note on Residency Placement

Although there are more residency positions than graduating students, the fact that there are unplaced graduates from previous years seeking residencies means that there is no guarantee that every graduating student will be successful in acquiring a residency program.

Administrative Policies and Procedures

Students are responsible for compliance with the policies of Barry University and the School of Podiatric Medicine. Since these policies are under constant scrutiny, the School of Podiatric Medicine reserves the right to change any provisions or requirements in this document at any time within a student’s term of enrollment.

International Students

International students must comply with all policies and procedures of the International & Multicultural Programs Office (IMP), including, but not limited to presentation, in person, of appropriate documentation prior to the start of each semester. International students must register for no less than nine semester hours of credit during each of the fall and spring terms. Registration materials will not be processed by the University until international students’ documentation has been verified by the IMP.

Registration

Registration for subsequent semester courses is done online via WebAdvisor. All students must complete appropriate registration processes during times designated by the School of Podiatric Medicine. Faculty advisors will approve all registrations. Completed registrations are processed by the Office of the Registrar. To successfully register, students must ensure that all potential holds (financial, health) are resolved.

Registration in any and all elective courses must be approved by the Associate Academic Dean or Associate Dean of Clinical Education before the registration can proceed to the Cashier/Business Office and the Office of the Registrar. Prior to seeking approval of the Associate Academic Dean or Associate Dean of Clinical Education, students registering for Research or Independent Studies courses must secure a faculty sponsor who will be responsible for evaluating their performance in the course. Students registering for Independent/Research courses must also submit a sponsor-approved research proposal to the Associate Academic Dean or Associate Dean of Clinical Education.

Students who fail to complete registration requirements, including appropriate financial arrangements with the Cashier/Business Office, within ten working days of the first day of class of any semester will not be permitted to attend classes, laboratories, clinical rotations/programs, to take examinations or participate in any other activities of the School. The School of Podiatric Medicine will notify the Financial Aid Office, which will subsequently notify scholarship programs, banks providing government-subsidized loans, etc., when students cease to be appropriately registered.

Tuition

Tuition for the Podiatric Medicine program is subject to annual review and revision. Students in standard four-year programs of study will be billed one-half of the annual tuition fee per semester for the first year and one-third of the annual tuition fee per semester for years two through four. This will equal 11 semesters of tuition. Students whose programs exceed 11 semesters will be billed as above for the first 11 semesters and at one-half of the annual tuition for semesters in excess of these. Tuition does not include the cost of purchase of books, and any other items, required during the program.

Financial Aid

Information about loans, scholarships and other financial aid is available through the Financial Aid Office. Students bear the responsibility to seek out financial aid information.

Withdrawal from the Program

Withdrawal from the Program is permitted only in the following cases:

  1. personal medical reasons;
  2. financial hardship;
  3. personal family hardship;
  4. student no longer wishes to continue training for the profession.

Withdrawal from a course for poor academic performance is not permitted. Students wishing to withdraw from the Program must complete a Student Withdrawal Form with the approval of their advisor, Associate Academic Dean, and the Dean. The date of withdrawal is the date on which the form is signed by the Dean. Students who withdraw from the Program on or before Friday of the tenth week of the Fall and Spring semesters (Friday of the seventh week in Summer Semester) will be receive a “W” for all incomplete courses; if the deadline falls on a University holiday, it will be extended to the next business day. Withdrawal after this date will result in students earning F grades for the uncompleted courses. These grades will be reflected on their transcript. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate and complete the withdrawal process in a timely manner.

Students seeking to withdraw due to medical reasons should consult with their Academic Advisor and Chair or Associate Academic Dean and the Office of the Dean of Students at Barry University, for the proper protocol for such withdrawals. Students who withdraw for aforementioned reasons #1–#3 are eligible to reapply for readmission to the Program. To do so they must petition the Dean at least four months before the time of their return and provide documentary evidence to support their petition. In instances of return after withdrawing for medical reasons, documentation from the treating physician indicating the readiness of the student to undertake the rigorous curriculum is required to be submitted to the Dean of Students at Barry University, for readmission to the University. Readmission to Barry University School of Podiatric Medicine is contingent upon this and requires the Dean of Students approval. The School of Podiatric Medicine makes no guarantees on the success of such petitions. Students who withdraw for reason #4 will not be readmitted to the Program.

Drop-Add and Course Withdrawal

Students should realize that the podiatric medical curriculum is intense, structured, and allows only minor modifications to be made. Addition of elective courses requires permission of the Associate Dean of Clinical Education or Associate Academic Dean. A period of registration adjustment (i.e., drop-add) is provided to students during the first week of each semester. During this time, students may change their schedules with the written approval of their advisor, and the Associate Dean of Clinical Education or Associate Academic Dean.

Withdrawal from a course for poor academic performance is not permitted. Withdrawal from a course is only permitted if one or more of its prerequisites are not satisfied. In such cases, the adjustment results in a removal of registration from the affected course and must be done within the first two weeks of the semester. The only other mechanism for withdrawal from a course is if the student withdraws from the Program (see above Withdrawal from the Program). Withdrawal from a course may severely limit the number of courses a student may take in future semesters as many courses require prerequisites.

A student who fails a prerequisite course will be withdrawn from subsequent courses that require its successful completion; this will be carried out by administrative action shortly after the failure to successfully remediate the course (see Remediation Policy). It will also extend a student’s time in the program. Advisor’s and Dean’s approvals and signatures are required in any case of schedule modification.

Students in extended programs are not permitted to drop or withdraw from courses once the courses have begun. Students who fail Gross Anatomy (SPM 590) will not be permitted to continue their studies until Gross Anatomy is passed. Students returning to the program after academic suspension due to failure of SPM 590 (Gross Anatomy) are required to repeat all Fall semester coursework upon their return, regardless of previous performance. Students must be enrolled in at least five credits of classes per semester to be considered full-time students in the podiatric program.

Students may not withdraw from clinical rotations, hospital rotations, or clerkships due to failing or otherwise unsatisfactory grades. Refer to Podiatric Clinical Rotation Training Manual for further policies specific to clinical experiences. Withdrawal from the podiatric program can be carried out at any time after consultation with the student’s advisor and with the approval of the Associate Academic Dean.

Transcripts

To request an official transcript, students may order transcripts online at http://webadvisor.barry.edu

Transcripts cannot be processed or released if there are outstanding financial obligations to Barry. For additional information please visit https://www.barry.edu/registrar/transcript.html

Incomplete (“I”) Grades

A grade of Incomplete (“I”) indicates a failure to complete required work within the semester and implies the instructor’s consent that the student may make up work that is deficient. The Associate Academic Dean must be informed in writing by the instructor when an “I” grade is issued. If a student has an “I” grade that may be rectified by a comprehensive remediation examination. This examination must be completed by the end of Wednesday of the first week of the following semester. An “I” grade earned for any other reasons must be satisfied by completion of the required coursework before the end of the next semester. 

The approval of the Associate Academic Dean is required for the activities that will take longer than the first week of the next semester to complete. When the work is completed to the satisfaction of the instructor, the “I” grade will be changed to a letter grade. The instructor will forward a completed Grade Adjustment form to the Office of Associate Academic Dean for signature and then to the Office of the Registrar for recording purposes. Students, under special extenuating circumstances, (e.g., illness, leave of absence, etc.) will be temporarily granted an “I” grade in a course which they will need to resolve as above.

A grade not reported as completed within the first week of the next semester becomes an F. Failure in any course in which an incomplete was issued will (1) be reflected as a grade of F for the course, and (2) result in academic probation or suspension retroactive to the beginning of the semester in which the course was taken. If the “I” grade is not satisfactorily resolved, this may result in the failure to meet published prerequisites for another course. Therefore, a course schedule adjustment (drop) will be necessary. This may extend the academic program beyond four years.

Reporting and Recording of Grades

Students may view final grades online via their WebAdvisor account at the end of each term. Any error in grading, the omission of a course, etc. should be reported to the Office of the Registrar within two weeks following the end of the term.

The Office of the Registrar does not record percentage scores for any course or test; it does, however, permanently record the letter grade earned by the student in every course he/she takes while in the School of Podiatric Medicine. Individual instructors must be contacted to obtain percentage scores earned in any particular course.

Technology Competency and Computer Requirements

The School of Podiatric Medicine requires all students to own and be competent in the use of a laptop computer (or a tablet; currently tablets cannot be used for examination purposes). Students’ laptop computers/tablets should be configured to meet or exceed technological standards set by the program. Minimum standard specifications are found at the Barry University Division of Information Technology webpage: http://rnwsupport.barry.edu/answers/278/pcpurchase.pdf

Information technology resources are integral to the education of the medical student. Barry University provides a number of information technology resources to students, including e-mail, internet and intranet services, WebAdvisor, library services, and access to computer laboratories (see catalog section for Division of Information Technology). Many course instructors provide student access to course materials on the Canvas Learning System and communicate with students through e-mail. All examinations are administered electronically using ExamSoft software. This software currently works only on laptops (except Chromebooks) and desktop computers. All students are required to install this software on their device of choice and use it for all examinations. Only in cases of verifiable device failure may paper examinations be provided. Occasionally, at the discretion of the faculty, examinations may be given in paper form.

E-mail is considered the standard and official means of communication between the faculty, staff, and students of the School of Podiatric Medicine. For that reason, students must monitor and maintain their Barry University (mymail.barry.edu) email accounts. Due to identity and privacy concerns, administration, faculty, and staff of the School of Podiatric Medicine may refuse to respond to email messages from students who use external e-mail providers.

Student Health

Every student in a clinical program must secure and retain primary care health insurance coverage that meets the Barry University requirements upon entry into the School of Podiatric Medicine. Coverage must remain in effect at all times while registered in the School. There is an insurance plan offered through the University that covers all charges at the Student Health Center and will also cover services to off-campus United Health Care providers. All graduate student taking six or more credits are eligible for the Barry University Health Plan (see https://www.uhcsr.com/).

At the beginning of each year of enrollment, all students must maintain with the Health Compliance Office proof of adequate health insurance by providing a copy of the enrollment form for the student insurance. If the student is covered by an insurance plan other than the Barry student insurance, he/she must complete a waiver online at https://studentcenter.uhcsr.com/ If the student has a change in insurance coverage, proof of new insurance plan is required. Failure to waive or supply proof of Barry student insurance will result in withdrawal from all clinical activities and potential delays in progression through the podiatric medical programs.

Upon entry into the Podiatric Medicine Program, every student must provide proof of the following via American DataBank Complio (Immunization Tracking Package):

  • Statement of Good Health within six months of date of entry;
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination and booster (or adequate titer);
  • Tetanus/diphtheria booster within the past ten years;
  • Hepatitis B vaccination series;
  • Varicella (chickenpox) immunity by titer or evidence of vaccination;
  • Purified Protein Derivative (PPD) screening for tuberculosis or chest x‑ray if PPD is positive;
  • Proof of health insurance coverage effective in the state of Florida. (Coverage must include doctor’s office visits.)

Each student must update their PPD status every 12 months. Some clinical sites may require more frequent PPD updates.

If a student is found to be noncompliant with any of the above preventative measures, a “hold” will be placed on their account. If a student does not resolve these holds, they will not be permitted to:

  • Register for classes;
  • Participate in clinical rotations; or
  • Graduate.

Criminal Background Checks and Drug Screening

It is the intent of the School of Podiatric Medicine to maintain a healthy and drug-free learning environment and workplace. Consequently, prior to matriculation into the School of Podiatric Medicine, all applicants are required to undergo a criminal background check (including a fingerprint check) and a drug screening. All fees assessed due to the background check will be the responsibility of the student. If the background check reveals a criminal conviction or a plea of no contest, the offer of a place to the applicant may be withdrawn. Clinical rotation sites can also require a criminal background check and may refuse to accept students with documented criminal histories. If a criminal conviction, or a plea of no contest, occurs after matriculation into the program, the student must notify either the Chair of Basic Medical Sciences or Associate Academic Dean or Associate Dean of Clinical Education about it since it may have impacts on his/her education, not excluding dismissal from the Program.

Many clinical rotation sites also require drug screening of students prior to entering and, in some cases, during clinical training. The School of Podiatric Medicine will dismiss students who either fail a drug screening prior to, or after, matriculating into the program or who refuse to submit to a drug screening. The School of Podiatric Medicine will also withdraw the offer of a place to applicants who either refuse to submit to a drug screening or fail a drug screening.

Academic Policies and Procedures

Attendance

Attendance at all classes is highly recommended for all School of Podiatric Medicine courses. An instructor may, at his/her discretion, include attendance as part of the grade that a student earns or reduce a grade for absences while enrolled in a course. Students are responsible for all material and assignments covered in every course and all examinations, including unannounced quizzes. In the case of prolonged absence from classes, it is the student’s responsibility to inform his/her advisor of the absence and indicate the expected return to class. Upon return the student should provide the appropriate documentation justifying his/her absence. For prolonged medical absences, a doctor’s note indicating the student’s fitness to return to class should be submitted to the Dean of Students.

Attendance at scheduled examinations is mandatory. Examinations may be given outside of normal class hours due to space or time limitations. Only under extraordinary circumstance will examinations be rescheduled. any rescheduling will require the approval of the Associate Academic Dean and/or the Chair of Basic Medical Sciences, and the course instructor. A copy of the unanimous consent of the students in the course at the time that the change is proposed, will also be required. Missed examinations, quizzes, and other evaluations will be graded 0 percent unless the absence is excused. Acceptance of excuses for all absences, and the administration of make-up evaluations (including scheduling and format) are solely at the discretion of the instructor.

Attendance is mandatory for stated clinic hours when applicable. No student will be permitted to leave the clinic or hospital early or arrive late. Attendance at all clinical rotations is mandatory and all excused absences must be made up (see Clinical Rotation Training Manual). Requests for absences from a clinical rotation must be presented at least two weeks prior to the requested dates of the absence, and it is the responsibility of the student to find someone willing to “cover” for him/her during the absence. Last minute requests will likely not be honored. Students may be required to repeat one or more entire rotations as a result of excessive absences.

Academic Integrity and Behavior

The School of Podiatric Medicine strives to inculcate academic integrity and ethical professional behavior in its students. Cheating and plagiarism are not tolerated in the School of Podiatric Medicine. Refer to the Policies and Procedures section of this Graduate Catalog and the Barry University Student Handbook for definitions of cheating and plagiarism. A student who gives or receives information or assistance during a testing session will automatically fail and earn 0 percent as an exam or quiz grade. The same consequence will apply to any proven case of plagiarism. Accusations of cheating or plagiarism will be adjudicated by the Honor Code Committee (see Student Honor Code of Conduct Below). Following this adjudication, the individual(s) will be referred to the Dean for appropriate disciplinary action and the incident will be documented in the student’s file. Any student who is referred to the Dean for violation of the cheating and plagiarism policies on two occasions will be dismissed from the University. For a detailed description of what constitutes plagiarism students can consult any number of online resources and hardcopy texts. One such text is Writing papers in the biological sciences (4th ed) by Victoria E. McMillan, Bedford/St. Martin’s Publishing, New York, (2006).

Professional Conduct Code

Podiatric medical students must model the highest professional, moral, ethical and honorable behavior at all times whether in lecture rooms, laboratories, other campus facilities, or off campus. Standards for conduct are delineated in the Barry University Student Handbook, BUSPM Student Handbook, Clinical Rotation Training Manual, course syllabi, and other documents that may be distributed by faculty and staff.

A Professional Deficiency protocol exists that permits the recording and reporting of conduct that contravenes the above to the Dean of the School of Podiatric Medicine. The reporting may be done by any Barry University faculty, staff and service personnel on campus or in a clinical setting. Disruptive behavior such as violence, shouting, profanity, and other behavior that is disrespectful of the rights and sensitivities of the campus faculty, staff, service personnel or public falls under this protocol. The use of cell phones during lectures, laboratory sessions, examinations, and other University events is likewise disruptive and may be grounds for reporting of a professional deficiency.

Student Honor Code of Conduct

Students in the School of Podiatric Medicine are entering a profession that prides itself on maintaining high standards of honor, trust, and professional conduct. It is expected that, during their education at Barry University, podiatric medical students will conduct themselves in a manner becoming a podiatric physician. The School of Podiatric Medicine has developed an Honor Code to ensure that all students are familiar with, and committed to, the highest principles of conduct from the start of their podiatric medical education.

Students are required to affirm their compliance with these principles upon initial enrollment in the School of Podiatric Medicine with the following statement:

I agree to abide by the Honor Code of the School of Podiatric Medicine. I agree that I will conduct myself in an honest and ethical manner during all activities during the course of my enrollment, including, but not limited to my academic work, as well as my interactions with fellow students, faculty, and staff.

The Honor Code will be enforced by the Honor Code Committee. This committee is made up entirely of students, and with one non-voting faculty advisor. All students will receive the Honor Code document during orientation and will be held responsible for its contents.

Transfer Policy

No transfer from another Podiatry school into the first or second year of BUSPM is permitted. However, transfer into the third year of the program may be permitted provided that the applicant has successfully completed Part I of the APMLE series and following an evaluation of applicant’s academic transcript by the Faculty Student Evaluation Committee (FSEC). Applications to the Podiatric Medicine program from candidates with prior medical degrees (MD, DO, MBBS, MBChB) may be considered for admission into the second semester of the first year. Such applicants will be required to provide transcripts of all coursework for evaluation by the FSEC and be required to attend an interview.

Academic Advisement

Every student matriculating into the Podiatric Medicine program at BUSPM is assigned an academic advisor by the Chair of Basic Medical Sciences. Full-time faculty members assume academic advising responsibilities. Advising assignments may be changed by the Chair of Basic Medical Sciences at his discretion or at the request of the student or advisor. In the advising process, BUSPM students must:

  • Be aware of the educational objectives of the institution and observe them;
  • Comprehend the institution’s criteria for evaluating student progress in academic programs;
  • Comply with the institution’s standards for academic success and continuance in programs for graduation. The institution is under no obligation to grant a degree or keep the student enrolled in the program if he/she fails to maintain satisfactory academic progress;
  • Understand and complete all degree requirements for graduation;
  • Make his/her own academic decisions after consultation with the advisor. The advisor’s role is to advise the student. However, the final decision must be made by the student.

Grading Scale and Examination Policy

The official grading policy of BUSPM (exclusive of clinical rotations/externships) is as follows:

A

90%–100%

B

80%–89.99%

C

70%–79.99%

F

below 70%

Clinical rotations for all students will be graded according to the following scale:

A

3.5 and above

B

2.5 to 3.4

C

1.0 to 2.4

F

below 1.0

The School of Podiatric Medicine does not use plus or minus letter grades. The grade/honor point associated with each of the letter grades is noted in the Barry University Academic Information section earlier in this catalog.

A grade of credit (CR) or no credit (NC) may be assigned to a course if specified in the course syllabus and approved by the Associate Academic Dean. In such cases, the requirements for achieving a CR grade will be stated in the syllabus.

The type, content, and frequency of examinations will be determined prior to the beginning of each course by the faculty member(s) directing the course. This information will be presented in the course syllabus to the students at the beginning of the course. In keeping with the policy of academic freedom, each faculty member reserves the right to determine the percentage of the final grade that is associated with attendance, dress, attitude, professional behavior, examinations, quizzes, laboratory assignments, and other criteria of evaluation. These requirements must be specified in the course syllabus; however, the course instructor may administer additional evaluations at his or her discretion. The course instructor ultimately determines the final grade in a course.

An examination may not be administered outside the scheduled examination period unless extenuating circumstances warrant it. Students who do not take an examination at the scheduled time for an acceptable, valid reason will be required to take a makeup exam before the Wednesday of the week after the end of the semester. The format of the examination may be different from the original.

Academic Good Standing

For a BUSPM student to be considered to be in good standing academically, he/she must maintain both a semester average and a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00, have no unresolved F grades and have no outstanding financial obligations to the School of Podiatric Medicine or to Barry University.

Failed courses must be remediated as per the Remediation Policy. If the student fails to successfully remediate a course, then the course must be repeated in its entirety. The final transcript must have no F grades. Unsatisfactory resolution of an F grade in a repeated course or withdrawal from any course that is repeated will lead to automatic dismissal from the Podiatric Medicine program. Repeated courses will usually result in extending a student’s education beyond four years. All coursework must be completed within six years from the time of first matriculation into the program. In order to graduate with a degree of Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, all candidates must have passed both Part I and Part II of the APMLE series and will have authorized the release of test results to the School of Podiatric Medicine.

Academic Disciplinary Actions

A podiatric medical student will be placed on academic probation if he/she:

1. earns a cumulative or semester GPA less than 2.00 but at least 1.00;

    OR

2. earns one F grade in any semester.

Students who are not in good standing will be periodically reviewed by the FSEC to determine eligibility to remain in the program. The Dean or Associate Dean of Clinical Education or Associate Academic Dean of the School of Podiatric Medicine may require a student on probation to register for a limited course load, resulting in extending a student’s education beyond four years.

Probation will be lifted after completion of the immediate next semester of active registration if the student earns a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher with no new F grades. However, a student will not be in good standing until he/she has resolved all F grades on his/her most current transcript.

A podiatric medical student will be suspended if he/she:

1. earns a GPA of less than 1.00 in any semester;

    OR

2. qualifies for academic probation for two consecutive semesters;

    OR

3. earns more than one F grade in any semester, regardless of GPA;

    OR

4. earns an F grade in any semester of extended academic coursework;

    OR

5. fails Gross Anatomy (SPM-590);

         OR

6. fails the APMLE Part I examination after two attempts.

A podiatric medical student will be dismissed from the program if he/she:

1. earns three F grades in any semester, regardless of GPA;

        OR

 2. fails the APMLE Part I examination after three attempts;

       OR

3. fails a repeated course ;

       OR

4. withdraws from a repeated course.

Any student on probation or with unresolved grade deficiencies, as previously stated, will not proceed into the clinical rotations of the third year. A minimum C grade must be earned in any repeated course.

A student who has been suspended for academic reasons may petition for readmission. A suspended student is ineligible to take classes with degree-seeking status in the School of Podiatric Medicine for at least two semesters following suspension. The suspended student must petition the Dean for readmission at least four months before the beginning of the semester in which the student intends to resume course work. The Dean will present the student’s petition for readmission to the FSEC. The decision of the FSEC is final. The Office of the Registrar must have approval of the Dean of the School of Podiatric Medicine to readmit a student following suspension.

A student who has been dismissed for failing the AMPLE Part I exam after three attempts cannot petition for readmission to the School of Podiatric Medicine at Barry University.

Remediation Policy

All students who earn a final grade of F in a course must take a Comprehensive Remediation Examination in the failed course. This Remediation examination shall be administered on a set date in the first week of the semester immediately following the one in which the F grade was earned. Students must score a minimum of 70 percent to pass the Comprehensive Remediation Examination and the highest grade that can be recorded is a C. This grade shall replace the previously earned F grade. Students who fail to achieve a minimum score of 70 percent in this exam shall retain the F grade on their transcript and shall be subject to the Academic Disciplinary Actions previously described. This Remediation option is only permitted for one course per semester and can be utilized for a maximum of three courses in the Program. Students cannot remediate any course more than once.

Academic Programs in Excess of Four Years (Extended Programs)

Withdrawal and/or repeating of courses will usually result in extending a student’s education beyond the minimum of 11 semesters. Students in extended programs will be assigned a special academic advisor. Students in academic programs in excess of four years generally take a reduced course load during the preclinical phase of their education, but they must enroll in at least 5 credits per semester to maintain full-time status for the purpose of financial aid eligibility. Overload course registrations are generally not allowed due to the intensity of the podiatric medical curriculum.

Students in extended programs are not eligible to withdraw from courses once the courses have begun. Should students earn an F grade, they will be dismissed (See statement in Academic Disciplinary Actions above).

All first- and second-year course work must be completed within three years of matriculation. Pursuant to CPME accreditation requirements, no student may continue coursework beyond six years (17 semesters) of first matriculating into any podiatric medical program.

Students in extended programs will be billed for full tuition until they have paid for four complete years (11 semesters). Such students will be billed for one-half the annual tuition for each semester in excess of the eleven.

Interim Requirements

Students in BUSPM must take the APMLE Part I board examination in July of their first year of eligibility. Students become eligible to take this examination after passing all first- and second-year courses. A “Three Strikes Policy” exists at BUSPM with respect to the APMLE Part I board examination: Students who fail it at their first attempt will be required to retake it at its very next administration. Therefore, students who fail this examination on their first attempt in the July are required to take their second attempt in the October of the first year of eligibility. If they fail the October administration, they will be suspended. Students are required to take the examination for the third time at its next administration in the July of the next year. Should they fail the examination on their third attempt they will be dismissed from the Podiatric Medicine program with no recourse for return.

No student can enter the third-year clinical rotations without passing all first- and second year courses. Students must pass the OSCE in order to graduate. Students who fail this examination must take remedial instruction until competency has been demonstrated. Students cannot enter fourth-year externships until they have passed all third-year courses and the OSCE. Failed courses, as well as failed rotations, must be repeated in their entirety and passed prior to graduation.

Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate with a degree of Doctor of Podiatric Medicine, candidates must have:

  1.  satisfactorily completed all basic science courses, clinical rotations/requirements, and externships/clerkship program requirements;
  2. a GPA of 2.00 or greater with no outstanding F grades;
  3. satisfactorily completed the OSCE at the end of the third year of the curriculum;
  4. satisfactorily completed the Senior Exit Examination at the end of the fourth year of the curriculum;
  5. passed all parts of the APMLE series, and will have authorized the release of test results to the School of Podiatric Medicine;
  6. maintained acceptable professional standards (see Professional Conduct Code);
  7. fulfilled all responsibilities and financial obligations to Barry University and the School of Podiatric Medicine; and
  8. been recommended for graduation by the faculty to the Board of Trustees.

Recommendation for the DPM degree is a discretionary right residing with the faculty/administration but shall not be withheld arbitrarily. There is no contract, stated or implied, between the School of Podiatric Medicine and the students, guaranteeing that a degree will be conferred at any stated time, or at all.

Academic Appeals and Grievance

Students have the right to appeal any grade which they feel was inappropriately assigned. Students will be allowed a maximum of 10 business days after the grade for a quiz or examination is made available to appeal that grade with the course instructor, unless otherwise specified in the course syllabus. If informal discussions with the faculty member do not resolve the appeal, the student must present, within 15 business days of receipt of the grade in question, an appeal in writing, with supporting documentation, to the Associate Academic Dean of the School of Podiatric Medicine, who will convene an ad hoc Grade Appeals committee and will respond within 10 business days. If this response does not satisfy the student, the student may appeal in writing, within two business days, to the Dean of the School of Podiatric Medicine. The Dean will respond within five business days of receipt of the appeal. The decision of the Dean regarding the appeal is final. Students who do not challenge or appeal a particular grade within the time periods as described above waive all future rights to appeal that grade. Nonacademic grievance and appeal procedures are outlined in the Barry University Student Handbook and bylaws of the Florida Podiatric Medical Students Association.

Academic Curriculum

The curriculum of the School of Podiatric Medicine leading to the DPM degree normally takes four years to complete. The first two years mostly involve didactic basic sciences courses (many with laboratories, see following). The third and fourth years involve primarily, but not exclusively, clinical didactic courses and clinical rotations through several local hospitals and the Barry University clinics (see Podiatric Clinical Rotations).

Students must complete all requirements for the DPM degree within six years of initial matriculation into any podiatric medicine program. All courses must be completed prior to graduation. Podiatric medical students may be required by the Dean or Associate Academic Dean to take a reduced number of courses (due to withdrawals, course failures in their first or second year, or other extenuating circumstances), which will extend the duration of the program beyond four years.

The following curriculum is continuously reviewed and is therefore subject to change.